Tag: Confidence

Don’t Make an Enemy of Your Best Friend.

The Pensive Buttoner pic

What is the worst thing a guy can do to his best friend?

Ask him to be the Best Man at his wedding!

He will have to make a speech fitting for the occasion and also find a tuxedo that fits. He will lie awake night after night wondering what to say and worrying about it.  It will totally occupy his mind for weeks. As the time draws near pimples will start sprouting on his face from the stress. Everyone else’s preparations for the wedding seems to be going smoothly except his speech.

Finally the day arrives, the guests look splendid and happy but the best man cannot enjoy himself, it is the worst experience of his life. He is sure he will make a fool of himself, no one will find his jokes funny.

Fight or flight mode kicks in, all the blood drains from his brain to his muscles in readiness to run like hell. His memory, starved of oxygen and blood shuts down and he completely forgets his opening lines. His mouth is so dry not a word can come out. Poor guy!

My advice: Don’t make an enemy of your best friend by asking him to be best man at your wedding unless you provide him with an experienced speaking coach.  If you ask me, I know just the man for the job. He makes speaking in front of an audience an exciting and fun challenge. He can provide your best man with guidance on gathering content, structuring and delivering his speech. And perhaps most importantly, how to make it really captivating by weaving in anecdotes and stories. The audience will love it and he will be the second most popular guy.

For workshops and 1:1 specialised coaching:

martin.jugmans@gmail.com

 

 

Elon Musk Drives His Point Home.

Elon Musk Drives His Point Home.

Last Thursday in sensational style Elon Musk unveiled the Tesla electric truck. After driving the futuristic truck into full view of the audience he stepped out from the driving seat amid enthusiastic cheers-worthy of a rockstar. At first he seemed bit overwhelmed and not knowing what else to do threw his arms in the air. As the audience quietened down he got rolling with his presentation extolling the virtues of his new truck. He did not disappoint and the truck appeared to give birth to a sleek new roadster. Using feisty language and adding a dash of exaggeration he made his point, “The point of doing this is just to give a hardcore smackdown to gasoline cars,” and went on to say, “Driving a gasoline sports car is going to feel like a steam engine with a side of quiche.”

His language is hip, peppered with humour and he makes lofty claims which leave little room for interpretation. Musk has shown he is Mr. Sustainable and a guy who walks his talk. If all he did on stage was burp he would probably get a rapturous applause. He opts to use playful language and colouful metaphors. Before the unveiling of the truck he tweeted, “This will blow your mind clear out of your skull and into an alternate dimension.”

His passion and vision are clearly reflected in his speech and reveals his adventurous personality.

Charisma, Essential To Have In A Public Speaker’s Repertoire.

confident-business-womanCharisma, the ability to attract, charm and influence people is often thought of as a mysterious indescribable gift bestowed on only a privileged few.

The etymology of charisma is kharis from the Greek meaning grace, beauty, kindness and kharisma, meaning  favour or grace.

Christian contexts have often referred to charisma as power entrusted to an individual by Divine favour for the good of the Church. It is not surprising then that charisma is associated with having a supernatural gift. It may look as if a charismatic person has some superior magnetism and unique talent but as research and scientific study suggest, charisma can be learned.

Each person’s own unique brand of charisma is developed using a combination of skills learned through practice and application.

5 Strategies for Boosting Your Score on the Charismatic Calibrator.

Authenticity. Take a genuine interest in people, ask questions, listen to their needs and concerns, remember their names and details about conversations.

Appearance. Have a neat appearance pay attention to detail. Act at ease yet supremely confident.

Clarity. Practice good annunciation, use pauses, metaphors, stories and anecdotes to create a visual component. Whether you are delivering a speech or having a conversation make your dialogue easy to follow and understand.

Conviction. Speak passionately and believe in what you say. Look at the people you are talking to.

Humour. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Enjoy yourself during the conversations you are having and when you are on the podium. Smile. When appropriate be lighthearted.

Any number of virtues contribute to a person having charisma. To be charimatic one does not have to acquire all the traits, by tweaking and adjusting behaviours and building on strong points in one’s character an aura of charisma is radiated.

Charisma strategies when learned and applied will improve the quality of your public speaking,  interpersonal relationships and transform you into a people magnet.

How to Manage Public Speaking Anxiety.

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The skills in giving a great presentation lie in preparation and practice.

What are the most common fears of giving a presentation?

* Fear of what people might think.
* Fear of how one looks.
* Fear of losing the thread.
* Fear of being vulnerable/showing weakness.
* Fear of being insignificant/lack of self-confidence.
* Fear of people losing interest.
* Fear of being in the limelight.
* Fear of feeling intimidated by the audience.
* Fear of making a joke and people not laughing.
* Fear of the power of the moment.
* Fear of failure.
* Fear of success.

10 Ways to Overcome Your Fear of Giving Presentations.

1) Goal.
Get a clear idea of how you want your audience to feel at the end of your presentation and keep this in mind during the preparations. What exactly do you want to convey? It is also important to determine beforehand how you will feel during the presentation.

2) Know your audience.
Find out who will be attending and include references appealing to their specific interests.

3) Construct your presentation.
It is important here to imagine yourself actually doing the presentation. Where is the venue, what does the interior look like how will it be when the auditorium is full? Will there be a microphone, handheld or lapel model? How will the lighting be? How will you be dressed, what sort of hand and body movements will you be making to reinforce your overall message. How will your voice sound? What sort of visual aids will you be using and where will they be placed?

4) Act confident.
Even if nervous, start the presentation with full confidence in a clear and controlled manner. Prepare an intro that captures the audience’s attention. Invite curiosity, excitement, mystery, shock, amazement, the audience will love it.

5) Content.
Use logic and a coherent organisation. Make references to the sources of quotes. Research the subject adequately. When using visual aids make sure they can be clearly seen, always speak to the audience and not to the screen or object.

6) Emotion.
Be sincere and convey a strong sense of conviction. Show your own excitement about what you are talking about. Allow the audience to really feel what is happening, use personal stories and humorous examples to illustrate a point. This will keep your presentation interesting.

7) Conclusion.
Maintain a sense of confidence while wrapping up with a powerful conclusion that sums up the entire presentation. The end is what your audience is mostly likely to remember. Make sure it sticks.

8) Practice.
Practice from beginning to end using all the props. Ask someone to watch you and make a recording. Listen to feedback. Practice until notes are no longer needed. Practice adding expression by refining variations in voice, volume, rate and tone. Speaking in a clear voice will hold the audience’s attention.

9) Speaking skills.
Polish your skills by getting acquainted with Toastmasters International or a Speakers Association. Watch videos of famous speeches, comedians and presenters. Anyone can do it.

10) Breathing.
Before speaking keep your breathing steady. Feel a sense of gratitude for the having the privilege of doing the presentation. Having done a thorough preparation the presentation will flow and if any disturbances occur you are better equipped to deal with them. For now all you need remember is your opening lines.

The key to overcoming fear when giving presentations is to build confidence. Knowing what you are going to do and how you are going to do it will make the experience enjoyable.